My Session with a Master Sales Coach

I have something a little different to share with you this week—an on-air coaching session with my sales mentor, the incredible Nikki Rausch (a/k/a The Sales Maven), that we recorded for her podcast.

I talk a little about my background and how my life experiences and my desire to change people’s lives for the better led me to where I am today: getting rid of people’s subconscious blocks, especially for women and women entrepreneurs.

I also talk about the origin of my MVP (Mindset, Visiblity, and Profitability) solution for getting rid of blocks and the MVP Club I host.

And all of this is part of a great 1:1 sales coaching session.

Please listen-in on our conversation:

(You can also visit the page for my episode of Nikki’s podcast here.)

You’ll hear me talk a bit about the results my clients get, different ways I work, and about the MVP Club itself—small groups of women entrepreneurs and leaders in which we release what holds them back from their bigger vision using Tapping.

Then you’ll get Nikki’s great suggestions for filling small group programs like the MVP Club.

Nikki’s podcasts—and trainings, and books, and workshops, and give-aways—are always full of useful information on ways to sell without ending up feeling covered in slime.

Instead, she teaches how to sell as a service to others, always keeping your relationships with them the priority.

When you talk with her on Zoom, or meet with her in person (I’ve done both), you experience how truly genuine Nikki is. Even when you know that she has her selling hat on, you know that you are important to her, that she cares about you as a person.

And that’s the approach she teaches.

I belong to Nikki’s Sales Maven Society and have been privately coached by her. I highly recommend working with her, or at least signing up for her weekly emails.

Just know, if you do work with Nikki I won’t get anything except the satisfaction of helping you find an amazing resource for learning to sell.

And yes, I’ll be implementing what Nikki recommended when I open my next MVP Club in the fall.

Happy Tapping!
—Nancy

How Does EFT/Tapping Work?

One of the most common questions I’m asked about EFT/Tapping is “How does it work?”

For the full answer, watch my video.

Here’s my abbreviated answer.

For a long time my answer was two-fold. First, I’d say no one really knows how it works, but I don’t care because I know it does and there’s research that shows it is effective.

Second, there was research that showed acupuncture and acupressure, which use the same points as Tapping, send a message of safety and calm to the amygdala in the brain that interrupts old connections there that trigger emotional responses.

The research has advanced since then. Now it tells us:

• Tapping leads to the downregulation of the amygdala, including a measurable lowering of the stress hormone cortisol. (Kinda the same thing I was saying in the past about that message of safety and calm, but in a more academic tone.)

• The results hold after we stop tapping because of Memory Reconsolidation, a way to permanently change the emotional component of a traumatic memory.

This explains why Tapping is a great way to release Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and phobias, but it still doesn’t exactly explain why MY tapping works.

Watch the video for my best guess on why Tapping works on success blocks like clients’ money ceilings.

When releasing subconscious success blocks, I rarely work directly with specific memories anymore. Many of these blocks come from multiple messages and years of experiences in childhood, many of which were not traumatic.

Plus, I’ve found—and created—faster Tapping techniques to effectively and permanently release success blocks than going through memories, one after the other, to get rid of all their emotional content.

So, while I believe I am using Tapping to send the message of safety and calm to the amygdala (i.e., “downregulating” it), I don’t know that I’m doing “Memory Reconsolidation” to make the changes permanent.

I’m guessing that there is some sort of Memory Reconsolidation for ideas that’s happening in the brain.

So I’m back to saying Tapping works on my clients’ subconscious success blocks. I don’t really know how, but I know that it does.

I’ll have to wait for the research to catch up to me to explain it all with hard science.

Hope that was interesting.

Until next time . . .

Happy Tapping!

—Nancy

What To Do When Your New Year’s Resolutions Fail

Yep. It’s that time again.

Time to make your New Year’s resolutions. Maybe you plan to . . .

  • Finish that training you bought
  • Create your on-line course
  • Network more
  • Whatever it takes to grow your business to the next level.

You’re going to do it this time Right?!

And you start out strong. But then, in six months—Or six weeks. Or six days. Or six hours!—you find you’ve given up.

(Been there. Done that. Gave up on resolutions completely for awhile.)

But why? Why do we give up when it’s so important to us?

Well, what I’ve seen over and over again is that when your resolution goes against something in your subconscious—even if your subconscious is being irrational, illogical, or just plain stupid—your subconscious always wins.

No amount of willpower can push past your subconscious for long.

It just wears you down until you give up.

Three types of subconscious blocks I’ve seen a lot of are:

  • A belief that you need to do (or avoid) something to stay safe.
  • Others’ limiting expectations of you.
  • Seeing yourself in a limiting way. (Check out the video for examples of what each of these looks like.)

So what do you do if you can’t seem to follow through on your resolution?

Well, the fastest way to change I know of is to uncover your subconscious block and tap to release it.

If you don’t know how to do that (or you don’t have a tapping practitioner to work with), what I’d suggest is to create a daily tapping practice with your resolution. Here’s how:

  • Set aside at least 5 minutes every morning.
  • During that 5 minutes, visualize yourself taking the action you’ve resolved to take AND getting the results you want.
  • (And, most importantly) Tap while you visualize.

Tapping whittles away at the underlying fear, limiting belief, or whatever.

So it gets easier to follow through on your resolution and, eventually, create the “new you.” And new and improved business.

No willpower required.

Happy New Year and Happy Tapping!
—Nancy

Join My Tapping Circle for Pandemic Stress

Come to my online Tapping Circle to release stress and overwhelm caused by the coronavirus pandemic for four Fridays starting March 27th, 2020. It’s free to anyone over 18. 

You might be reacting to stress from the news and changes in your community, work and home from the pandemic in different ways, like

  • Feeling overwhelming emotions,
  • Being unable to think clearly or take action, or
  • Having your body react with tension and even debilitating pain.

If you are reacting in any way that is not working for you, know that you don’t have to be stuck feeling and thinking like this. Tapping is a great way to release stress and get moving again. In this Facebook Live I recorded, I explain all about the Tapping Circle and how it works:

You can get more details for the Tapping Circle, including how to attend it online, at https://unblockresults.com/tappingcircle/ 

That page includes two additional videos. The first one teaches you the mechanics of tapping so you’re ready to tap along in the Tapping Circle, together with a tap-along for basic stress that you can use anytime you feel stressed. The second video shows you an easy move you can do now to avoid getting overwhelmed by the energy of everyone around you, which has been pretty intense in the past few weeks.

Come for just one, or two, or as many circles as you can.

The Science Behind Tapping

Someone recently asked me to talk about the science behind EFT/Tapping. It’s a question that doesn’t come up too often, but—being the research nerd I am—I was happy to explain what the science shows now.

Check out my new video about how Tapping works and the science behind it.

In the video I describe some of the research about Tapping and how it works. I also apply the theories to the work I do to explain how I think it makes the big changes it does for my clients.

Some of the examples I use show the changes to my clients’ blocks to allowing more money in and keeping it around. It is truly amazing for me to see the changes in my clients’ lives and their futures!

When you’re ready to create the financial life you want, email me to set up a call to talk about what’s going on with you and see if the Money Blocks BlockBuster Group is a fit for you.

Try out Tapping with me next week!

Next week you can try out some tapping with me. On Thursday, May 9th, at 10 am Pacific time/1 pm eastern, I’ll be the guest on a no-cost Zoom meeting, “Tapping to Free the Writer Within,” hosted by Ginger Moran, a published and award-winning writer and teacher who coaches people with a book bottled up inside who want to get it out.

I’ll be talking about using Tapping to release your creativity. We’ll do some actual Tapping to stop procrastinating and start taking action. And what we talk and tap on will be useful for any creative activity where you feel blocked, so don’t worry if you don’t have a novel you’re working on.

Register for the call here.

How to Tap—on one page! We’ll tap together on the call.

At the end of the call, you’ll also get access to a 3-part video series in which I teach you how to use Tapping to stop procrastinating, reduce your fear of getting outside your comfort zone, and break through money ceilings. So don’t miss this call.

When Brain Fog Descends

Here’s a fun way procrastination can show up:

  • You can’t think clearly,
  • You feel like you’re head is full of fluffy cotton,
  • You’re brain seems like it is set on “slow,”
  • Brain fog.

You know that feeling like you just can’t think, can’t make decisions, can’t get anything done? It’s actually a solution.

Watch the video to find out how brain fog can possibly be a solution to anything—and what to do if it’s not the solution you want anymore.

When you’re ready to clear away your brain fog, stop procrastinating, and create the life you are meant to live, email me. We’ll set up a call to talk about what’s going on with you and see if I can help.

One Very Good Reason You Might Be Sabotaging Your Business

“Elizabeth” had a big block. Lately she had been unintentionally sabotaging her relationships with her big clients She was worried that it was jeopardizing her business, and she was right. She needed to get rid of her block. But her block wasn’t quite what she thought it was.

Elizabeth works hard at everything she does. When her clients say they need something, she always takes on the project immediately no matter how unreasonable the time frame. Then she knocks herself and her staff out getting it done. She has taken that old adage to “underpromise and overdeliver” and thrown away the “underpromise” part. She promises her clients everything they want in record time, struggles to make it happen, and then finds that they don’t appreciate how hard she works. Of course, she rarely tells them how difficult it will be to meet their deadlines, so how could they?

stressed callerShe also overdoes things at home. Despite having a successful business making more than enough money, she does all the cleaning and cooking at home. She manages her seventh grade son’s schedule, personally making sure he gets to all his after school activities, attends his games, and hosts his friends at home at least once a week. And when he started struggling in math, she researched geometry books, got the one with the most recommendations, and tutored him herself. When her husband complained about their outdated kitchen, she hired the general contractor then made all the decisions and dealt with the inevitable problems on her own.

She was stressed out and not sleeping well the few hours she allowed herself to lie down. Her health was deteriorating. The doctors were prescribing Continue reading “One Very Good Reason You Might Be Sabotaging Your Business”

Sleep and Screens

One of the surprises I ran into as I researched sleep problems is that screen time–watching TVs, computers, Kindles, Nooks, smartphones, iPads, etc.–lowers your ability to sleep. This was a surprise to me as I have several friends and relatives who use the TV to wind down at the end of the day and get to sleep.

Apparently that is not a good plan for people with sleep issues. While all light will wake you up, those flickering lights from back-lit screens are the worst. They tell your brain that it is daytime, and time to be awake. One study showed that two hours spent looking at a “self-luminous electronic display” will suppress melatonin by 22 percent. Melatonin regulates your sleep cycle, so you need it to get to sleep.

The experts have a few recommendations to avoid this problem. First, limit your total screen time to lower the effect on your melatonin production. Second, take a break from the screens for two hours before you want to fall asleep. That gives your brain some time to realize it is nighttime, and it might be a good idea to get sleepy. Third, if you have to have a screen on right before bed, dim the light to lower its effect on your melatonin levels.

All of this confirms my recent decision to record most of the sleep program I have been working on in audio format. To be honest, I made that decision when I found out just how much it would take me to do everything in video. I realized I just wasn’t up to the task, despite taking on-line trainings and getting myself familiar with a webcam that is highly recommended for exactly the kind of trainings I have in mind.

So I choose to look at my stepping away from the video-format as a positive for my program. I will do just a couple of videos, and do the rest of the training as audios. That way, people can listen to the program right before bed–or even cue up tapping exercises to use when they wake up in the middle of the night–and it won’t keep them awake.

If you have trouble sleeping, take a look at how much time you stare at screens during the day, and especially in the hours before bedtime. Maybe it’s time to read a book instead!

What Optimism Will Get You

I’m back! I took a few weeks off to follow Stephen Covey’s advice to “sharpen the saw” (and maybe get a little downtime in to increase my creativity), and now I feel ready to get back to work in a big way. While I was away, I spent some time re-reading an oldie but goodie, Martin Seligman’s Learned Optimism. In his book, Seligman points to research that shows that, for the most part, pessimists get bad results and optimists get good results in their achievements, mood, health, and (possibly) longer life.

The book is full of great information that you can use to improve many areas of your life. I’m just going to focus here on how you can use his research to improve your work, but feel free to get your own copy of his book to get all the benefits his approach offers. Since this is important, and Seligman has a lot to say, I’m going to describe it over several articles.

Is the glass half full, or half empty?In this post we’ll look at what optimism can do for you, when you should use an optimistic approach and when you should choose a more cautious, pessimistic style. Optimism can be very powerful and overcome a lot of self-imposed blocks to your success, but you wouldn’t want to use it in every situation. Sometimes a touch of pessimism is called for.

First, What an Optimistic Approach Can Do For You

When a negative event happens, big or small—maybe the boss frowns at you, a client ends the relationship, you get fired—everyone feels at least momentarily helpless. For someone with an optimistic explanatory style, it hurts, but the feeling goes away relatively quickly and they can get on with creating the life and work they want. For someone with a more pessimistic explanatory style, that helpless feeling can go on a long time, leaving them stuck right where they are. So how we  explain what happens to us determines how helpless or energized we become, which affects what we do, which in turn affects what we achieve.

Let’s see how this works. Imagine your boss tells you that your work on that last report was not up to her expectations. If you are a pessimist, you think things like “I’m no good at this,” or “Bosses always shoot you down,” or “I never get anything right.” This way of thinking saps your energy, leaving you with a feeling of Why Bother. If you are no good, you never get anything right, and your boss will always shoot down your efforts, there is no point to even trying. So you lose motivation, put in less effort at work and the next thing you know your reviews go downhill and you’re stuck in a dead-end job (or are out of work!).

Now let’s look at what happens if you use a more optimistic explanation for what happened. You feel bad, of course, but soon you start telling yourself things like “I’ve been worrying about Mom’s health lately, so I probably wasn’t as focused as I could have been,” or “This project was really rushed and I just didn’t have time to do it right,” or “I really didn’t understand what my role was and so I screwed it up.” With explanations like that, you shake off the pain of the moment and start making plans to do better next time, tell your boss what you need to fix the situation, or find a new job that is a better fit for you. You don’t feel helpless for long, and you have the energy you need to take action to succeed.

So the optimists go on to clear things up with their bosses, do better on the next project, learn new skills, apply for that interesting job, and get promoted. The pessimists sit back and tell themselves there’s no point, so those positive career moves elude them. Another way of saying this is that the optimist persists in the face of challenges; the pessimist doesn’t. This means that pessimists fail more often, even when they could have succeeded.

You can see how an optimistic style could also propel a small business owner beyond her more pessimistic competitor. Say they both lose an important customer. Ms. Optimist thinks “I didn’t give him enough attention over the past month,” or  “The local economy took a hit that made it hard for him to buy from me now, but I just have to find a way to hang on until the upswing happens and clients like him can come back,” or “Sometimes I lose one for reasons I can’t control, but what I provide is useful so I can always bring in more customers.”

Compare her motivation and energy level after the loss of her customer to Mr. Pessimist, who says “I’m such a loser,” or “The economy is in the tank and there’s nothing I can do about it.” Ms. O looks for ways to improve what she offers and how she gets the message out to potential customers; Mr. P hunkers down and waits for the ax to fall. Who’s going to succeed?

The Value of Pessimism

This is not to say that pessimism doesn’t have it’s place. There are definitely advantages to using pessimism in certain situations. It would seem that pessimists tend to have a better grasp on reality. Optimists see what could be; pessimists see what is. Therefore, pessimists are by and large more accurate, particularly in situations where there are unexpected and frequent disasters.

Pessimists also tend to be more cautious. While an optimist thinks that things will work out, the pessimist buys insurance just in case. Pessimists save more money for a rainy day. They avoid danger.

So a touch of pessimism belongs in every career and every life at times. The trick is figuring out when to use a pessimistic approach and when to use an optimistic one.

When to Use Optimism versus Pessimism

Here are some guidelines for when to use an optimistic approach and when to be more pessimistic in your work.

Choose optimism:

  • In a situation where you want to achieve, like selling, getting a promotion, or being chosen to work on a high profile project.
  • If you need to keep up your morale, like cold calling or networking.
  • Where you want to lead or inspire people.
  • Where creativity is needed.
  • Where the cost of failure is low, like applying for a job.

Choose pessimism:

  • If you are planning for a risky or uncertain future.
  • When counseling others whose future is not rosy, say, in a yearly review with an underperformer.
  • Where physical safety is at issue.
  • Where the cost of failure is high.

Let’s look at that last bullet-point more closely, because it is really the crux of your decision. If the cost of failure is high, you should use a pessimistic approach. Seligman gives examples of the pilot deciding whether to de-ice the plane again or the partygoer who needs to decide whether to drive or take a taxi home. Accidents and death are high costs to pay for failure. Choose caution and pessimism in those situations.

There are many situations where the costs of failure may feel high, but in fact are quite low. Consider the salesman who has to decide whether to make another call where he may be rejected; the independent professional who is considering offering a new service; the executive who has hit a ceiling at her current employer who is thinking about using (or building) her network to look for a new position. While rejection feels bad, it doesn’t really kill you. For that reason, all of the people in these and similar situations should choose an optimistic approach.

Seligman also lists jobs that require an optimistic approach and those that need a more pessimistic one. Here they are. Only optimists need apply for:

  • Sales
  • Brokering
  • Public relations
  • Presenting and Acting
  • Fund-raising
  • Creative jobs
  • Highly competitive jobs
  • High-burnout jobs.

Mild pessimists, or cautious types with a keen sense of reality, do well in “‘low-defeat jobs, jobs with low turnover, jobs that call for specific technical skills in low-pressure settings.” Seligman’s examples are:

  • Design and safety engineering
  • Technical and cost estimating
  • Contract negotiation
  • Financial control and accounting
  • Law (but not litigation)
  • Business administration
  • Statistics
  • Technical writing
  • Quality control
  • Personnel and industrial-relations management.

Of course, even a job that calls for a realistic approach will have times where an optimistic approach is called for. Think of an accountant. He needs to be a realist with the numbers but use a positive approach when motivating his team. Or when he needs to bring in new clients. So even if your career falls squarely into the pessimist camp, realize that there are times to be optimistic. Flexibility will be your friend.

Here’s the best news of all. You don’t have to be born an optimist to get the benefits of an optimistic approach. You can learn how to use an optimistic explanatory style, then apply it whenever you choose.

In my next article I’ll detail the elements that go into an optimistic explanatory style. It’s not just putting on rose-colored glasses! There are three specific ways of looking at events, particularly negative events, that help you move forward with energy and motivation. Next week I’ll explain what those three ways are. After that I’ll show you Seligman’s specific techniques for changing a pessimistic explanatory style to an optimistic style.

Nancy Linnerooth

About Nancy

Nancy Linnerooth has been helping professionals, executives and business owners for well over a decade to get rid of their internal blocks so they can meet their career and business goals.

These internal blocks often show up as repeating patterns of behavior that undercut what they’re trying to accomplish, like procrastinating; avoiding public speaking, cold calling and networking; choking in interviews; and becoming overwhelmed and losing focus.

Nancy comes to the world of coaching with a diverse background as a practicing psychotherapist of many years and a recovering attorney who got her JD from Harvard Law School. So she understands the demands of working in a high-pressured, high-stakes world.

Contact Nancy at nancy@unblockresults.com.

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